Go to the Movies

Go to the Movies

Valuing our cultural creations is a balancing act that requires wisdom and courage. Cultural educator and Vox film critic Alissa Wilkinson shares with us the future skills we can all hone for a fuller engagement with art and life. Alissa’s essays and reviews encourage us to be more attentive in our consumption—but not in the ways we might typically consider. Alighting on subjects as varied as C.S. Lewis, Alien: Covenant, The Good Place, and Breaking Bad, Alissa and I explore what it means to be a “critic,” how art can connect us through time and space, and how we can stay one step ahead in a new age of “creative machines.” We wrestle with how data literacy can change what we consider valuable—from diversifying the Oscars to the problem with Rotten Tomatoes. And we cover apocalypse anxiety! As co-author of the book How to Survive the Apocalypse: Zombies, Cylons, and Politics at the End of the World, Alissa offers insights to how we think about end times, and how to live with our connected individuality.


Show Notes


Meet Your Future Self

Meet Your Future Self

Every thought about the future is a creative act, adding to the process by which we imagine, experience, and become our future selves. Coach and mindfulness expert Stephanie Hardwick gives us a pragmatic set of perspectives and tools for thinking about our future: showing us the power of thinking to shape our circumstances, avoiding what she calls “happiness shaming,” and building better responses to the stressors of life—from the everyday traffic jams to our most difficult questions of belonging and self-worth. She has led Ben and others through coaching to practice these tools, and you’ll get to experience her guidance through our conversation. Stephanie’s aim is to help others discover the truth that underneath our multitude of thoughts and concerns is an immense and compassionate core just waiting to be noticed. Find out what Stephanie calls the most important question you can ask yourself, and follow along at the end of our episode with her guided meditation to meet your future self.


Show Notes


Raise the Dead

Raise the Dead

Life after death—right here on earth—is now a reality for a growing number of patients who were once technically declared dead. As a world-renowned expert in resuscitation science and an Emergency Room physician at Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego, Dr. Zack Shinar is a hands-on practitioner of ECMO, or Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation, a life support procedure that involves pumping one’s blood outside the body. Zack walks us through his first encounters cheating death with ECMO and how it has become a regular work day for him to do so. Find out how he’s influencing the worldwide medical community and creating unique educational experiences to expand the impact of resuscitation science from his podcast ED ECMO to an annual conference he co-founded called Reanimate. We discuss future skills like interdisciplinary curiosity, statistical literacy, and effective decision-making for both doctors and patients. Hear how attending one of Zack’s Reanimate Conferences gave one man the skills to bring his own son back to life.


Show Notes


Listen with Everything You've Got

Listen with Everything You’ve Got

Unearthing your true capabilities as a learner and a leader begins with listening, and Karen Kocher, head of 21st Century Jobs, Skills, and Employability at Microsoft, is a world-class listener. We find out through her stories of learning from both her family and her global network of thought leaders about how we too can make a “dollar feel like a million,” as a colleague of Karen’s said about her time as Chief Learning Officer at Cigna. Karen’s mastery of impact and efficiency comes from her boundless curiosity and optimism that says we are all innate learners, and so we are all capable of greatness—we just need nudges from signals beyond ourselves in order to develop an ear and a hunger for what’s different and innovative. Listen in on how Karen’s lessons on leadership come together in heartfelt care for her team member’s individual and collective purposes.


Show Notes